Monday Motivation: Chore Chart

I’m working on a new chore chart for myself.  I adapt it around my routines, but this is how I try to maintain a clean home.  Nothing should take more than fifteen minutes.  If it takes longer than that, it’s no longer maintenance.  What do you do to maintain?

 

AM:

Empty Dishwasher
Start a load of laundry
Quick wipe master bathroom after showers
Vacuum

NOON:

Wash morning dishes after lunch
Pick up toys before naps
Switch laundry
Fold laundry (during naps)

PM:

Prepare dinner
Wash afternoon dishes after dinner
Switch laundry
Quick wipe kids’ bathroom (during baths)
Pick up toys before bed
Sweep
Prepare tomorrow’s meals

WEEKLY:

Wash windows
Dust
Mop
Organize anything else that has been neglected

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Monday Might: Recommitted (Goal-Setting)

Now that the semester is over I get to crack down and get recommitted to the things that have started to slip. It just takes a couple of days for me to lose track and then things start spiraling out of control. I guess that’s how it is with two toddlers. If I don’t pick up, or do the dishes for ONE day – just one day – all heck breaks loose.

I have to admit, I am sorely tempted to just take a nap.

No, I have got to recommit. If I don’t have a plan or goals, I just feel all scattered and clumsy. So, about every quarter I recheck my goals and realign them with what I hope to accomplish.

To recommit, I sit down with my list of the six dimensions of wellness: physical, emotional, intellectual, interpersonal, spiritual, and environmental (Insel, pg 3). I consider where I need to improve in each of these dimensions, what I can do to develop in these areas, and how to accomplish that. I think I’ll also consider how I’ve grown in these areas and what I feel good about.

Core Concepts in Health 11th ed. by Paul M. Insel & Walton T. Roth
Pg 3 (my own suggestions are in parentheses)
Physical
Emotional
Intellectual
Interpersonal
Spiritual
Environmental
Eating well
Optimism
Openness to new ideas
Communication skills
Capacity to love
Having abundant, clean natural resources
Exercising
Trust
Capacity to question
Capacity for intimacy
Compassion
Maintaining sustainable development
Avoiding harmful habits
Self-esteem
Ability to think critically
Ability to establish and maintain satisfying relationships
Altruism
Recycling whenever possible
Practicing safe sex
Self-acceptance
Motivation to master new skills
Ability to cultivate support system of friends and family
Joy
Reducing pollution and waste
Recognizing symptoms of disease
Self-confidence
Sense of humor
Fulfillment
(Clean and organized surroundings)
Getting regular checkups
Ability to understand and accept one’s feelings
Creativity
Caring for others
(Environment is free of clutter)
Avoiding injuries
Ability to share feelings well with others
Curiosity
Sense of meaning and purpose
(Home and auto maintenance)
(Self-efficacy)
Lifelong learning
Sense of belonging to something greater than oneself

For myself, I also add another dimension of health, which is the “Temporal” dimension. This includes my temporal needs which could be included under “Intellectual” or “Environmental” or even “Occupational” or “Financial” but none of those really quite sum it up. “Temporal” health includes financial health or balancing a budget; maintaining food storage and emergency preparation; estate planning and planning for death/potential disability (sounds morbid, but I don’t want to leave this out there for the state to deal with in the event that it happens); understanding my rights, the laws I am governed by, and knowing what my insurance covers; developing my earning potential, and career planning; job satisfaction; improving my generativity (what I contribute to my posterity); etc.

Some things apply to several dimensions.  For instance,  I believe that writing in my journal improves my health on several levels: emotional, intellectual, spiritual, and even temporal.  It may even improve my physical health if I’m away from my computer or the television for a bit, and feel inspired to do something productive afterwards.  Doing my visiting teaching works on my emotional, interpersonal, intellectual, spiritual, and temporal well-being.

I have a binder with at least four of these dimensions on tabs.  I have some lined paper in the front of the binder where I record my thoughts or make lists involving the goals for each of the categories and place them under the appropriate tab.  I also add anything to the tabs that I obtain, like, for example, the food storage tips I get at church every week go under the “temporal” tab so I can refer back to them.  When I learn about new exercise programs that I like, I print them and put them under my “physical” tab. Pinterest also helps me organize my goals…even distant goals.

I found some great ideas for worthy goals at a site called “Pursuit of Excellence“.  WOW!!  What an awesome resource!!

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Setting goals and working toward those goals can strengthen your faith in the Lord Jesus Christ by helping you develop patterns and qualities of discipleship in your life. Pursuit of Excellence can help you to follow the Savior’s example of “a more excellent way”  (1 Corinthians 12:31).
Begin by asking the Lord to help you determine what you will work on. Decide how you will evaluate and record your progress. Discover how the Spirit affirms your progress. You will find that your greatest reward will be an increase of the Spirit in your life. Your faith will grow, and your testimony will be strengthened.
The goals listed below are intended to help support and strengthen you in your responsibilities as a son or daughter of Heavenly Father and to help you establish righteous habits and patterns for a lifetime.

Need more ideas about goal-setting, check out a few links:

Pursuit of Excellence (AWESOME!!!):  http://www.lds.org/service/serving-in-the-church/relief-society/leader-resources/new-relief-society-sisters/pursuit-of-excellence?lang=eng
Fly Lady (Finally Love Yourself):  http://flylady.net/
Simplify 101:  http://www.simplify101.com/
Self-Reliance and Family Well-Being:   http://www.lds.org/family/family-well-being?lang=eng